The National Institute of Polish Rural Culture and Heritage is being established

Deputy Prime Minister Beata Szydło, Minister of Agriculture and Rural Development Jan Krzysztof Ardanowski and Deputy Minister of Culture and National Heritage Jarosław Sellin announced the establishment of the National Institute of Polish Rural Culture and Heritage. The work of the Institute’s Scientific Council will be overseen by Deputy Prime Minister Beata Szydło.

The Institute’s main tasks will include researching, promoting and documenting the culture of the rural population, as well as expanding our knowledge of it. The Institute will base its functioning on the resources of the Central Agricultural Library in Warsaw.

We call back to a similar initiative which was successfully carried out during the interwar period in pursuit of rural development, but also for the purpose of nurturing rural traditions and culture – everything that is part of a tremendous heritage and contributes to our national culture said the Deputy Prime Minister.

Jan Krzysztof Ardanowski said that it is an institution that the community of the rural areas is very much looking forward to. On the one hand, it brings unending work of having to document all the contributions that the Polish countryside has made to our national heritage. This covers areas such as spiritual culture, manifested through various types of folk art, folklore, poetry, as well as folk handicraft, but also material culture, which has had a huge contribution to Poland’s development said Ardanowski.

Deputy Minister of Culture Jarosław Sellin stressed that folk and traditional culture enjoys a comprehensive patronage of the state. So far, we have lacked such an institution of research, education and development dedicated specifically to this field of cultural creativity. Owing to this initiative by the Minister of Agriculture, such an institution is now being established said Sellin.

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