Prime Minister: The history of post-war Szczecin is an important point on the map of rebuilding historical truth

Prime Minister Mateusz Morawiecki participated in the opening of the exhibition entitled “The Furthest Poland. Szczecin 1945-1948 ” in the National Center for Culture in Warsaw. This is the first exhibition that shows the history and fate of the inhabitants of Szczecin and its border areas in the first years after World War II, which is not commonly known in Poland.


Photo: Adam Guz / Chancellery of the Prime Minister of Poland

"Today, we can proudly think of Szczecin as a great Polish city located farthest to the west, which is at the same time very well integrated with Poland, which is why we have made a number of great investment decisions regarding Western Pomerania", said the head of the government during the exhibition inauguration.

The Prime Minister also recalled the post-war history of Szczecin and people who rebuilt the city after World War II. “In the post-war years, Szczecin was considered a place of lawlessness. However, the Poles were able, in that maze of lawlessness, uncertainty and lack of faith  for a free Poland in the future, which fell within the claws of the communist apparatus of repression, to build Polish Szczecin. This is the miracle of Polish post-war Szczecin that we can enjoy today ”.

Exhibition entitled "The Furthest Poland. Szczecin 1945-1948

The exhibition "The Furthest Poland. Szczecin 1945-1948 ”is a joint initiative of the State Archives, National Museum in Szczecin and the History Center Zajezdnia in Wrocław. Its originator and curator is Piotr Semka, and its organisers are the "Remembrance and Future" Centre in Wrocław, National Museum in Szczecin, and the State Archives in Szczecin.

Post-war Szczecin

The aim of the exhibition is to show the beginnings of the post-war life of Poles in Szczecin. The authors presented the specificity of everyday life in these areas at that time. Visitors can see unpublished photos showing, among other things, how tightly the border was guarded in December 1945. There are also photos shocking with their tragedy and showing the price paid for the attempts to build a normal life in Szczecin, for example a photo of a police officer shot dead in the Arkoński Forest.

The exhibition also presents the role of the Catholic Church in the process of settling Poles  in Western Pomerania and Szczecin.

The history of Szczecin shown to the inhabitants of Warsaw

The exhibition was created on the 75th anniversary of the incorporation of those lands into the Polish state.

Until mid-August, the exhibition could be seen at the Solidarności Square in Szczecin. Now, the inhabitants of Warsaw will be able to get familiarised with the history of Szczecin in the period immediately after World War II.

The head of the government also participated in the premiere of the "Okruchy Wolności" film in the Lower Silesian Film Center in Wrocław. The vision of Alicja Grzymalska tells the story of 1989 and Fighting Solidarity. The film features witnesses of those events and dr Kamil Dworaczek from the Institute of National Remembrance who deals with the development of documents about the Fighting Solidarity. Archival materials recorded by Alicja Grzymalska with the use of the movie camera donated to the Orange Alternative by Andrzej Wajda were used.

Exhibition entitled "The Farthest Poland. Szczecin 1945-1948

Prime Minister Mateusz Morawiecki participated in the opening of the exhibition entitled “The Farthest Poland. Szczecin 1945-1948” in the National Centre for Culture in Warsaw. It is a joint initiative of the State Archives, National Museum in Szczecin and the History Centre Zajezdnia  in Wrocław. Its originator and curator is Piotr Semka, and its organisers are the "Remembrance and Future" Centre in Wrocław, National Museum in Szczecin, and the State Archives in Szczecin.

The aim of the exhibition is to show the beginnings of the post-war life of Poles in Szczecin. The authors presented the specificity of everyday life in those areas at that time. Visitors can see unpublished photos showing, among other things, how tightly the border was guarded in December 1945. There are also photos shocking with their tragedy and showing the price paid for the attempts to build a normal life in Szczecin, for example a photo of a police officer shot dead in the Arkoński Forest.

The exhibition also presents the role of the Catholic Church in the process of settling Poles in Western Pomerania and Szczecin.

The exhibition was created on the 75th anniversary of the incorporation of those lands into the Polish state.

Until mid-August, it could be seen at the Solidarności Square in Szczecin. Now, the inhabitants of Warsaw will be able to get familiarised with the history of Szczecin in the period immediately after World War II.

 


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