Prime Minister Mateusz Morawiecki: We will never agree to let anyone speak about Poland's co-responsibility for the Holocaust

We will never allow anybody to say that Poland shares responsibility for Holocaust, stated Prime Minister Mateusz Morawiecki during his meeting with representatives of foreign and Polish media in Markowa in the region of Podkarpacie, where the Ulma family, murdered for hiding Jews, was from.


1 of 23
Photo: W. Kompała / Chancellery of the Prime Minister

The Polish nation and the Polish state were not co-responsible for the Holocaust

Poland as a state and as a nation was not co-responsible for the Holocaust. It is extremely important to explain this in the near future and to talk i.a. with our friends in Israel and the United States and with our partners in other countries in Europe, said Prime Minister Mateusz Morawiecki.

The Prime Minister reminded that during World War II, 6 million Polish citizens were killed, of whom 3 million were Polish Jews.

They were all Polish citizens, 6 million Poles were killed during World War II. We will never agree to let anyone speak about Poland's co-responsibility for the Holocaust, the Prime Minister stressed.

Responsibility for crimes, victims and everything that happened during World War II is on Hitler's Germany, said Prime Minister Mateusz Morawiecki.

We will not allow anyone to use the phrase Polish death camps

Prime Minister Mateusz Morawiecki emphasized that the Polish government will not allow anyone to use the phrase Polish death camps, because it is an insult to all victims brutally murdered by Nazi Germany.

If we want to assign responsibility for all these crimes to their victims, it is an insult to the victims, as well as to all others who wanted to help their fellow men, like the Ulma family, said the Prime Minister.

The Prime Minister stressed that he condemns all crimes committed against Poles, Ukrainians, Jews and other nationalities – regardless of the origin of the criminals. He declared that he would like to support historical research on World War II and invited historians from Israel, Germany and other countries to Poland to conduct historical research in Poland on what really happened during World War II.

I would like to invite all historians who would like to go deeper into the subject of these terrible times of World War II. Research on World War II must be possible, I will personally support it. Everyone who wants to help in discovering the whole truth about the war criminals is welcome in Poland, said Prime Minister Mateusz Morawiecki.

We lost our future

The Prime Minister reminded that Poland was occupied for over 2,000 days during World War II. He added that today's economic life of the country still suffers from the effects of war and communism. He expressed the conviction that even today Poland's economic and social life is conditioned by what happened during World War II and by its consequences.

It is not just about the truth and history, it's also about what we lost in 1939 – we lost our future, said the Prime Minister.

The Ulma Family Museum of Poles Saving Jews in World War II 

Prime Minister Mateusz Morawiecki, who is staying in Podkarpackie voivodeship today, paid a visit to the Ulma Family Museum of Poles Saving Jews in World War II. The Prime Minister began his visit to Markowa with laying flowers on the grave of the Ulma Family. He also laid flowers at the monument dedicated to the Memory of Jewish victims of the Holocaust and Unknown Poles murdered for helping them, and lit a candle at the wall engraved with the names of Poles Saving Jews in the Podkarpackie Voivodship. The Prime Minister invited foreign correspondents to visit the Ulma Family Museum together.

The Ulma Family Museum of Poles Saving Jews in World War II is the first museum in Poland dealing with the subject of saving the Jewish population in the occupied Polish territories during the Holocaust.

Józef and Wiktoria Ulma lived in Markowa village in today's Podkarpackie voivodship. During the German occupation, despite the poverty and danger to life, the Ulma family gave shelter to eight Jews, for which they were killed together with their children.

In 1995, Wiktoria and Józef Ulma were honoured posthumously with the title Righteous Among the Nations. In 2010, the president of the Republic of Poland, Lech Kaczyński, awarded them with the Commander’s Cross of the Order of Polonia Restituta.


See also